Carbon Monoxide in Wood Smoke

Discussion on health consequences of air particulates

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Re: Carbon Monoxide in Wood Smoke

Postby candi » Tue May 11, 2010 12:37 pm

The Montana article doesn't really surprise me. My dad lives there and I've been venting to him about the smoke from my neighbors. He told me everyone uses wood heat in Montana, and the gov't encourages it. Although he sees why I'm upset about it from a health stand point, he certainly likes to argue with me about it from my neighbor's point of view...LOL.
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Re: Carbon Monoxide in Wood Smoke

Postby Wilberforce » Sun Feb 27, 2011 7:20 pm

Call for comments: Proposed action on National Ambient Air Quality Standards for CO.
http://www.epa.gov/ttn/naaqs/standards/ ... cr_fr.html

EPA to hold public hearing on air quality standards for carbon monoxide.
http://yosemite.epa.gov/opa/admpress.ns ... 420054ED80
• The Surgeon General has determined that there is no safe level of exposure to ambient smoke!

• If you smell even a subtle odor of smoke, you are being exposed to poisonous and carcinogenic chemical compounds!

• Even a brief exposure to smoke raises blood pressure, (no matter what your state of health) and can cause blood clotting, stroke, or heart attack in vulnerable people. Even children experience elevated blood pressure when exposed to smoke!

• Since smoke drastically weakens the lungs' immune system, avoiding smoke is one of the best ways to prevent colds, flu, bronchitis, or risk of an even more serious respiratory illness, such as pneumonia or tuberculosis!
Does your child have the flu? Chances are they have been exposed to ambient smoke!
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Re: Carbon Monoxide in Wood Smoke

Postby gilberthsmith » Fri Mar 04, 2011 3:30 am

Anyone who is experiencing headaches, nausea, etc must get away from the source ofthe poison gas as soon as possible and the source of the poison gas must be shut down.It is a well-known fact that incomplete combustion of carbon-based fuels can result indangerous levels of carbon monoxide. It effect your health and you will suffer from many breathing problems.
Life is a game.
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Re: Carbon Monoxide in Wood Smoke

Postby Wilberforce » Fri Jun 24, 2011 4:59 pm

Paper

Non-invasive measurement of carbon monoxide burden in Guatemalan
children and adults following wood-fired temazcal (sauna-bath) use

Nick Lam, Mark Nicas, Ilse Ruiz-Mercado, Lisa M. Thompson, Carolina Romero and Kirk R. Smith
J. Environ. Monit., 2011, Advance Article

DOI: 10.1039/C1EM10172B
Received 18 Feb 2011, Accepted 12 May 2011
First published on the web 20 Jun 2011

http://feeds.rsc.org/~r/rss/EM/~3/xo8ZJ0MTW6w/

The use of wood-fired steam baths, or temazcales, is a potentially dangerous source of CO exposure in Guatemalan Highland communities where adults and children use them regularly for bathing, relaxation, and healing purposes. Physical characteristics of children predispose them to absorb CO faster than adults, placing them at greater exposure and health risks. Efforts to quantify temazcal exposures across all age groups, however, have been hampered by the limitations in exposure measurement methods. In this pilot study we measured COHb levels in children and adults following use of the temazcal using three field-based, non-invasive CO measurement methods: CO-oximetry, exhaled breath, and by estimation of COHb using micro-environmental concentrations and time diaries. We then performed a brief comparison of methods. Average CO concentrations measured during temazcal use were 661 ± 503 ppm, approximately 10 times the 15 min WHO guideline. Average COHb levels for all participants ranged from 12–14% (max of 30%, min 2%), depending on the method. COHb levels measured in children were not significantly different from adults despite the fact that they spent 66% less time exposed. COHb measured by CO-oximetry and exhaled breath had good agreement, but precision of the former was affected substantially by random instrument error. The version of the field CO-oximeter device used in this pilot could be useful in screening for acute CO exposure events in children but may lack the precision for monitoring the burden from less extreme, but more day-to-day CO exposures (e.g. indoor solid fuel use). In urban settings, health effects in children and adults have been associated with chronic exposure to ambient CO concentrations much lower than measured in this study. Future research should focus on reducing exposure from temazcales through culturally appropriate modifications to their design and practices, and targeted efforts to educate communities on the health risks they pose and actions they can take to reduce this risk.


Image
• The Surgeon General has determined that there is no safe level of exposure to ambient smoke!

• If you smell even a subtle odor of smoke, you are being exposed to poisonous and carcinogenic chemical compounds!

• Even a brief exposure to smoke raises blood pressure, (no matter what your state of health) and can cause blood clotting, stroke, or heart attack in vulnerable people. Even children experience elevated blood pressure when exposed to smoke!

• Since smoke drastically weakens the lungs' immune system, avoiding smoke is one of the best ways to prevent colds, flu, bronchitis, or risk of an even more serious respiratory illness, such as pneumonia or tuberculosis!
Does your child have the flu? Chances are they have been exposed to ambient smoke!
User avatar
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