Doctors demand ban on smoking in cars

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Doctors demand ban on smoking in cars

Postby Wilberforce » Wed Mar 24, 2010 8:09 pm

Doctors demand ban on smoking in cars

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Published Date: 24 March 2010
By LYNDSAY MOSS

A CALL for a ban on smoking in cars has come from doctors worried by growing evidence about the effect of cigarettes on children.

• Passive smoking is blamed for one in every five cases of sudden infant death syndrome, costing the lives of 40 babies a year in UK. Picture: PA

In a report today, the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) says, across the UK, passive smoking causes at least 22,000 new cases a year of asthma and wheezing in children – as well as more severe illnesses.

It found more than 20,000 chest infections, 120,000 bouts of middle ear disease and 200 cases of meningitis in youngsters were also thought to be linked to the effects of second-hand smoke inside and outside the home.

And passive smoking was blamed for 40 cases of sudden infant death syndrome every year – or one in five.

Professor John Britton, chairman of the RCP's tobacco advisory group, said legislation to ban smoking in the home would be "unenforceable", so views of "what is acceptable" had to be changed to protect the two million children who live in homes that allow smoking.

A total ban on smoking in cars and vans would be easier to police than the current situation, under which officers have to differentiate between business and private vehicles, he said.

"We would recommend a ban on smoking in all vehicles," he said.

The report also called for smoke-free legislation to be extended to other public places used by children, such as areas outside schools and nurseries and near playgrounds.

Scottish experts backed the findings of the report, supporting more extreme legislation to combat the effects of smoking. But smokers' lobby group Forest said banning smoking in cars was "unacceptable and unenforceable".

The Scottish Government said there were no current plans to ban smoking in cars.

Evidence suggests smoking within the enclosed environment of a car poses an even greater risk than smoking in the home, leading the RCP report to recommend increased enforcement.

A Populus survey last year found about three-quarters of children whose parents smoked in their car wanted them to stop and were worried about the effect on their own health.

Prof Britton said even drivers who never had child passengers should get out of their cars before lighting up for reasons of road safety.

Richard Ashcroft, a professor of bioethics at Queen Mary, University of London, who contributed to the report, said the review gave opportunities to clamp down on smoking in public places used by children, such as play areas and outdoor swimming pools.

Prof Britton said this could include banning parents from smoking near the school gates but that it would be difficult to legislate for situations such as family barbecues in private gardens. "Adults need to think about who's seeing them smoke," he said.

The report was funded by Cancer Research UK and carried out by the UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies, partly based at Nottingham University.

It also revealed the burden that passive smoking put on the NHS – it results in more than 300,000 GP consultations for children, some 9,500 hospital admissions and costs the NHS about £23.3m each year.

Prof Britton said: "Many parents believe that smoking in only one room or when the children have gone to bed will somehow protect the children from exposure. It doesn't."

He added there was also a "misconception" that opening a window would reduce risk.

The research found that children with two parents who smoked were almost nine times as likely to be exposed to second-hand smoke as those in non-smoking families. If the father smoked, then exposure was about three times higher; if the mother smoked, it was more than six times higher.

The RCP made a series of recommendations, including calls for increases in the price of tobacco, measures to tackle tobacco smuggling and illegal trading, and investment in media campaigns targeted at young people.

Other recommendations include cutting down children's exposure to images of people smoking in the media – with films and TV programmes which show gratuitous smoking classified as adult viewing – and stiff penalties for those who sell cigarettes to under-age youngsters.

Professor Terence Stephenson, president of the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, said: "We strongly support the policy recommendations and repeat the call for new approaches to address this problem so we protect the health of children and young people."

Dr Neil Dewhurst, president of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh, said:

"The evidence is compelling. Passive smoking exposure significantly increases the risk of a range of diseases in children."

Janet Davies, from the Royal College of Nursing, said: "The alarming evidence in the report makes it a moral duty to protect young people's health from the dangers of passive smoking."

A British Medical Association Scotland spokeswoman said:

"Parents may be aware of the risks to their own health from smoking, but this new report also highlights the devastating effect that exposure to second-hand smoke can have on children.

"Doctors would urge parents to give up smoking to protect their own health as well as that of their children."

But Simon Clark, director of Forest, said: "If you ban smoking in cars, which is a private space, it's a small step to banning smoking in the home. Both measures are unacceptable and unenforceable.

"Smoking in outdoor areas poses little or no threat to anyone's health. Banning smoking in parks and other areas where children congregate would be a gross over-reaction.

"We wouldn't encourage people to smoke around children, but adults should be allowed to use their common sense and act accordingly."

A Scottish Government spokeswoman said recent legislation had reduced the exposure of young people to smoking.

"While there are currently no plans to extend the smoke-free laws to private cars, the Scottish Government is conscious that private cars are now one of the main places for exposure of children to second-hand smoke," she said.

BACKGROUND

ACTION to tackle smoking inside cars has already been taken in several countries.

According to the Royal College of Physicians report, legislation prohibiting smoking in cars has already been introduced in some areas, including several states in Australia, Canada and the United States.

The RCP report – Passive Smoking and Children – said the UK faced a number of regulatory options for the UK to tackle smoking in cars.

These included banning smoking in private vehicles carrying children.

The report said: "The last of these is probably the most easily enforceable option, and would also address breaches of smoke-free legislation in vehicles that are workplaces, and improve road safety."

source
http://news.scotsman.com/uk/Doctors-dem ... 6175034.jp
• The Surgeon General has determined that there is no safe level of exposure to ambient smoke!

• If you smell even a subtle odor of smoke, you are being exposed to poisonous and carcinogenic chemical compounds!

• Even a brief exposure to smoke raises blood pressure, (no matter what your state of health) and can cause blood clotting, stroke, or heart attack in vulnerable people. Even children experience elevated blood pressure when exposed to smoke!

• Since smoke drastically weakens the lungs' immune system, avoiding smoke is one of the best ways to prevent colds, flu, bronchitis, or risk of an even more serious respiratory illness, such as pneumonia or tuberculosis!
Does your child have the flu? Chances are they have been exposed to ambient smoke!
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Parents' smoking gives 15,000 children a year asthma...

Postby Wilberforce » Thu Mar 25, 2010 8:15 pm

Parents' smoking gives 15,000 children a year asthma, doctors warn

Thousands more suffer chest infections and ear problems because of exposure to smoke from parents' cigarettes

Tens of thousands of children in the UK every year get asthma, chest infections and ear problems because they are exposed to smoke from their parents' cigarettes, doctors reveal today.

Secondhand smoke causes 15,400 children between three and 16 to develop asthma, gives 20,500 two or under a chest infection and 121,400 under-16s an infected middle ear, a report from the Royal College of Physicians warns. Another 600 under-16s get meningitis, 7,200 babies start wheezing and 40 children die of sudden infant death syndrome owing to passive smoking, the study says.

In total 165,000 children get such conditions, 9,500 need hospital treatment and 25,000 under-16s start smoking as a result of having one or more parents who smokes, while GPs undertake 303,900 consultations annually involving childhood illness linked to parental smoking, it adds.

Young people's health suffers so badly from adults smoking near them or living in a home where people light up that smoking in outdoor areas where children gather should be outlawed, the report from the RCP's tobacco advisory group concludes.

There was no point in proposing a ban on smoking in homes because that would be "unenforceable", said Prof John Britton, the group's chairman. But government action and changes in public behaviour were needed to protect the two million children being brought up in homes where smoking occurs, he added.

Some parents mistakenly believe that it is not harmful to smoke if they do it with a window open or after their children are asleep, Britton said. A child's exposure to passive smoke is about three times higher than a peer in a non-smoking family if the father smokes but is raised by more than six times if the mother does and by almost nine-fold if both parents light up, the report found.

The legislation banning smoking in public places that came into force in England in mid-2007 should be extended to tackle smoking in places popular with children, such as play areas and swimming pools, said Richard Ashcroft, a co-author of the report and professor of bio-ethics at Queen Mary, University of London.

The leaders of many of the medical royal colleges, which represent specialist groups of doctors, backed the proposals. Prof Steve Field, chairman of the Royal College of GPs, said the figures for childhood illness linked to passive smoking were horrifying. "These smokers are, in effect, forcing children to breathe what is essentially poisonous air," he said.

The chief medical officer for England, Prof Sir Liam Donaldson, said the report's recommendations "align very well with the government's 10-year vision for tobacco control set out in its new strategy for England". Ministers will decide whether to extend the scope of the public smoking ban when it is reviewed later this year.

A Department of Health spokeswoman said: "Children are being exposed to far less secondhand smoke as a result of smoke-free legislation. Parents have a responsibility to protect their children by stopping smoking around them in enclosed spaces like their cars and in their homes.", she added.

source
http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/ ... ren-health
• The Surgeon General has determined that there is no safe level of exposure to ambient smoke!

• If you smell even a subtle odor of smoke, you are being exposed to poisonous and carcinogenic chemical compounds!

• Even a brief exposure to smoke raises blood pressure, (no matter what your state of health) and can cause blood clotting, stroke, or heart attack in vulnerable people. Even children experience elevated blood pressure when exposed to smoke!

• Since smoke drastically weakens the lungs' immune system, avoiding smoke is one of the best ways to prevent colds, flu, bronchitis, or risk of an even more serious respiratory illness, such as pneumonia or tuberculosis!
Does your child have the flu? Chances are they have been exposed to ambient smoke!
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Location: USA

Re: Doctors demand ban on smoking in cars

Postby delanexy » Sat Jan 07, 2012 12:51 am

How long does it take meningitis symptoms to show? If you have meningitis symptoms eg(sore head, sensitivity to bright lights) how long does it take to show symptoms? Like what is the timescale in which the symptoms show? for example could you have a sore head one say and a rash would appear like a week later, or does it happen within a day or two?
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Re: Doctors demand ban on smoking in cars

Postby Tobiascute » Fri Feb 17, 2012 10:02 pm

Explain whether it is fair or reasonable for companies to ban employees from smoking in their cars in the company parking lot.
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Re: Doctors demand ban on smoking in cars

Postby Wilberforce » Sat Feb 18, 2012 7:01 pm

Tobiascute wrote:Explain whether it is fair or reasonable for companies to ban employees from smoking in their cars in the company parking lot.


On company time, they can't drink alcohol in their cars, can they?
• The Surgeon General has determined that there is no safe level of exposure to ambient smoke!

• If you smell even a subtle odor of smoke, you are being exposed to poisonous and carcinogenic chemical compounds!

• Even a brief exposure to smoke raises blood pressure, (no matter what your state of health) and can cause blood clotting, stroke, or heart attack in vulnerable people. Even children experience elevated blood pressure when exposed to smoke!

• Since smoke drastically weakens the lungs' immune system, avoiding smoke is one of the best ways to prevent colds, flu, bronchitis, or risk of an even more serious respiratory illness, such as pneumonia or tuberculosis!
Does your child have the flu? Chances are they have been exposed to ambient smoke!
User avatar
Wilberforce
 
Posts: 5013
Joined: Wed Jul 25, 2007 11:36 pm
Location: USA


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