Asthma and Wood Smoke

Research studies on wood smoke and other air pollution.

Asthma and Wood Smoke

Postby Wilberforce » Mon Apr 16, 2012 8:10 pm

Prevalence of Self-Reported Asthma in Urban and Rural Areas of Turkey
Posted online on April 16, 2012. (doi:10.3109/02770903.2012.677893)
Aydanur Ekici, M.D., Mehmet Ekici, M.D.,* Pinar Kocyigit, M.D., and Ali Karlidag, M.D.
http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10 ... 012.677893

Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Kirikkale University Faculty of Medicine,
Kirikkale, Turkey
*Corresponding author: Mehmet Ekici, M.D., Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Kirikkale University Faculty of Medicine,
Ziya Gökalp cad. Fabrikalar mah. Umut sitesi D blok. Daire 1., 71000 Kirikkale,
Turkey; Tel: +90-532-6419801; Fax: +90-318-2252819; E-mail: mehmetekici_@hotmail.com
Background and purpose. The risk factors for asthma in rural and urban population of Turkey are not well known. In this study we examined the effects of risk factors on the prevalence of asthma in adults living in rural and urban areas using data from a representative sample. Methods. Parents and grandparents of students from 20 randomly selected primary schools in urban and rural areas of Kirikkale, Turkey, were asked about respiratory diseases using the respiratory questionnaire, which were returned to us by their children. Results. Out of 13,225 parents and grandparents of primary school students 12,270 returned the questionnaires, for an overall response rate of 92.7%. The prevalence of asthma was more common in adults living in rural areas than in urban areas (10.8% vs. 6.2%, p < .0001, respectively). Asthma was more prevalent in women exposed to biomass smoke than those who were not exposed to it in rural areas (14.8% vs. 6.6%, p = .0001, respectively). Frequent childhood respiratory infections were more common in adults living in rural areas than in urban areas (18.2% vs. 10.9%, p < .0001, respectively). Exposure to biomass smoke and frequent childhood respiratory infections were associated with an increased risk of asthma, after adjusting for possible confounding factors in the logistic model for rural subjects. Chronic rhinitis (p = .0001) and frequent childhood respiratory infections (p = .0001) were associated with an increased risk of asthma, after adjusting for possible confounding factors in the logistic model for urban subjects. Conclusions. The prevalence of asthma in adults living in the rural areas of the Kirikkale Region in Central Turkey was significantly higher than that in the urban population. Exposure to biomass smoke and childhood respiratory infections were more common in adults living in rural areas. The higher rate of asthma in adults living in rural areas may be due to a higher frequency of childhood respiratory infections and exposure to biomass smoke.
• The Surgeon General has determined that there is no safe level of exposure to ambient smoke!

• If you smell even a subtle odor of smoke, you are being exposed to poisonous and carcinogenic chemical compounds!

• Even a brief exposure to smoke raises blood pressure, (no matter what your state of health) and can cause blood clotting, stroke, or heart attack in vulnerable people. Even children experience elevated blood pressure when exposed to smoke!

• Since smoke drastically weakens the lungs' immune system, avoiding smoke is one of the best ways to prevent colds, flu, bronchitis, or risk of an even more serious respiratory illness, such as pneumonia or tuberculosis!
Does your child have the flu? Chances are they have been exposed to ambient smoke!
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