Impossible to burn solid fuel cleanly under home conditions

Technical questions that one would like posed to experts
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Impossible to burn solid fuel cleanly under home conditions

Postby turning_blue » Tue Aug 12, 2008 6:05 pm

For the greenbuildingelement.com post,
The last article, see the previous articles. The last was, Heating Your Home: Radiant heat, wood heat. Please don't be annoyed with me, but I thought that article promotes wood based radiant heat. It says that "wood can be burned cleanly."

I am very confused. What answers do I have for a neighbor that wants to do this wood based radiant heat? Is that masonry?
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Postby Wilberforce » Tue Aug 12, 2008 6:21 pm

In the article, he states that home wood-burning can never even approach the
super-high temperatures necessary to burn off all of the ultrafine particulates.
"Clean woodburning" requires temperatures of at least 2,000°F, which can
only be reached in a blast furnace. This temperature is hot enough to melt steel.
Iron melts at 2800°F, and steel melts as low as 2,000°F (depending on the mixture)
Rapid oxidation of iron takes place above 1,500°F (the iron stove itself literally "burns")
Thus, ordinary woodstoves cannot be considered "clean" since they cannot
possibly operate at such high temperatures.
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Postby Wilberforce » Mon Sep 15, 2008 6:18 pm

Note: this article was relocated. Unfortunately, I mistakenly
deleted a related article during the transfer. (still learning
the ropes of this phpbb software!)
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Postby turning_blue » Tue Sep 16, 2008 2:33 pm

What's a masonry heater? I know someone who is building one.
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Postby 7river » Mon Oct 13, 2008 8:49 am

A masonry heater is a wood stove with lots of thermal mass and a chimney that directs the flue gases back and forth and extracts the heat before it leaves the chimney.
A small hot fire is burned usually once a day and the heat radiates out of the stove throughout the day/night.
It is important to operate the stove correctly and understand it is not for "viewing". Also the type and preparation of wood is very important.

I understand the fire is not hot enough to burn off everything, but how does the emissions of a 500-700 deg stove compare to other emmisions like cars, trucks, bikes, lawnmowers, oil burners?
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