Outdoor burners back on Barrie council's agenda

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Outdoor burners back on Barrie council's agenda

Postby Wilberforce » Sat Apr 25, 2015 2:26 pm

Outdoor burners back on Barrie council's agenda
By Bob Bruton, Barrie Examiner

Friday, April 24, 2015 8:23:08 EDT PM

A chiminea ban in Barrie has moved to the front burner.

City councillors will discuss a motion Monday to ban the backyard burners next Jan. 1, and stop issuing the permits on Oct. 1.

Coun. Bonnie Ainsworth says Barrie Fire Chief John Lynn has twice recommended a total ban on the advices - in March 2010 and November 2012.

"Seems ludicrous to me - not even considering interference with the ability of neighbours to enjoy their property - that one man's recreation can out-position another man's right to protect their family from smoke and gases from burning wood," she said, "that according to Environment Canada may contain sulphur, nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide and carcinogenic compounds from entering their home - even after studies have shown windows have been closed."

Ainsworth's motion for a total ban and stopping permit sales would, however, allow anyone buying the permit - which is increasing to $22 from $10 on May 1 - to continue burning until the end of the year.

A city bylaw allows chimineas for property owners or tenants with the owner's consent. It does prohibit their use between midnight and 8 a.m., with a $305 set fine and victims surcharge for infractions.

Barrie has a zero-tolerance enforcement policy, meaning all such fires are ordered extinguished upon complaint. A second complaint at the same address within 24 hours can result in a fine. A copy of this policy is provided to anyone receiving an outdoor burning permit.

About 3,500 people apply for the permits annually in Barrie.

Lynn has supported a ban in the past, saying fire department resources and people's health are most important. He has cited Environment Canada about the dangers of smoke and gases from burning wood.

Lynn has also cited a University of Washington study, Health Effects of Wood Smoke, that shows smoke wood particles are too small to be filtered by the nose and upper respiratory system - so they can end up in the lungs. Closed doors and windows don't stop these particles from seeping into homes either. Wood smoke also worsens existing conditions, such as asthma and emphysema.

Ainsworth said she doesn't understand that past city councils didn't get this.

"It is also hard to understand why twice in so many months the recommendation of Barrie's fire chief requesting a ban of these units, based on cost and health concerns, have been ignored, especially considering the availability of alternate outdoor fire opportunities such as gas and propane units or open air fires for the Kumbaya crowd," she said.

Chimineas permits are available online, at barrie.ca, and at Barrie Fire and Emergency Services Headquarters, 155 Dunlop St. W.

bob.bruton@sunmedia.ca

source
http://www.thebarrieexaminer.com/2015/0 ... ils-agenda
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Open Air Burning

The smell of wood smoke on a cold, clear night. It sparks feelings of coziness, the simple life and getting back to the good old ways. In Ontario citizens have a long, close bond with wood, fire and smoke. Ontario is vast and today we still burn organic material for a variety of reasons depending on the location:

• to heat our homes (wood stoves and fireplaces);
• to dispose of debris from gardening, agriculture and land development;
• to get rid of logging slash and prepare land for planting;
• to dispose of sawmill wood residue;
• to prevent wildfires;
• to enhance wildlife habitat;
• for beach and campfires.

But times have changed. What was once considered a harmless practice is now recognized as a major source of air pollution. Smoke from burning vegetation is now considered one of the most serious kinds of air pollution in British Columbia. In fact, it can be more hazardous to ones health than smog. Smoke also carries a variety of both proven and suspected carcinogens.

In addition, smoke particles are small enough to be breathed into the deepest parts of our lungs. It is associated with all sorts of health problems -- from a runny nose and coughing, to bronchitis, asthma, emphysema, pneumonia, heart disease and even death.

Senior citizens, infants and people who already have lung or heart problems are most at risk, but healthy younger adults and children can also be affected.
Research has shown that people of all ages can be negatively effected by smoke inhilation and exposure.

Following public consultation and a public meeting St Catharines council on February 23, 2015 passed a by-law to regulate the setting and maintaining of Open Air Fires and some other aspects of fire prevention in the City of St. Catharines.

The purpose of this by-law is to ensure the safety and well being of all residents of St. Catharines.
Penalty
The owner of a property where an open air fire has occurred is subject to a minimum fee of $250 for the extinguishment of the non-compliant fire and may be prosecuted for contravention of the by-law.

source
http://www.stcatharines.ca/en/livein/Op ... urning.asp
• The Surgeon General has determined that there is no safe level of exposure to ambient smoke!

• If you smell even a subtle odor of smoke, you are being exposed to poisonous and carcinogenic chemical compounds!

• Even a brief exposure to smoke raises blood pressure, (no matter what your state of health) and can cause blood clotting, stroke, or heart attack in vulnerable people. Even children experience elevated blood pressure when exposed to smoke!

• Since smoke drastically weakens the lungs' immune system, avoiding smoke is one of the best ways to prevent colds, flu, bronchitis, or risk of an even more serious respiratory illness, such as pneumonia or tuberculosis! Does your child have the flu? Chances are they have been exposed to ambient smoke!
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Re: Outdoor burners back on Barrie council's agenda

Postby Wilberforce » Wed Apr 29, 2015 6:01 pm

Barrie councillors say zero tolerance policy working well

By Bob Bruton, Barrie Examiner
Tuesday, April 28, 2015 1:43:46 EDT PM

City councillors threw cold water on a backyard burners ban Monday.

A motion to prohibit chimineas next Jan. 1, and stop issuing the permits on Oct. 1, was defeated.

Coun. Michael Prowse said he has never supported banning outdoor solid fuel burning appliances, and he's disappointed the issue was raised again.

"A couple of years ago we imposed a zero tolerance policy to help anyone who is having issue with their neighbours misusing them," he said. "Upon complaint the fire must be extinguished, a repetitive issue merits a fine.

"This ensures that those negatively impacted have recourse and it ensures that those that use these devices properly can continue to do so, which is very clearly the overwhelming majority of people."

The city received 147 burning complaints last year, 169 in 2013 and 231 in 2012.

"It would appear that a balance has been struck and the bylaw is working," Prowse said. "Not everyone will be happy. They never are with a compromise, but that's what we have - a reasonable compromise.

"I believe we got it right last time."

Coun. Bonnie Ainsworth, who asked for the ban, has noted Barrie Fire Chief John Lynn twice recommended it – in March 2010 and November 2012 - and that it's "ludicrous" the chimineas haven't been banned.

Ainsworth says that according to Environment Canada, smoke from chimineas may contain sulphur, nitrogen oxide, carbon monoxide and carcinogenic compounds from entering their home - even after studies have shown windows have been closed.

The Ward 1 councillor took some heat on the weekend for the proposed ban.

"I'm not used to feeling like the bad guy. People are very passionate about their rights to have fires," she said. "But not everyone lives on a large lot."

Eric Lehner, who lives on Lismar Boulevard, opposes the ban and had an e-mail exchange on the weekend with Ainsworth.

"It is the preferred Canadian way of life to blend tradition with respect for others through compromise where necessary," he wrote. "An outright ban imposed upon an entire community in a matter that is of concern to so few people is contrary to our best traditions.

"To deny thousands of Barrie residents the right to a time-honoured tradition, enjoyed by families and friends together, merely because a small percentage of people are not following the rules is not just."

Most Barrie councillors agreed the current zero-tolerance policy works.

"I believe we have addressed this to the satisfaction of most," said Coun. Arif Khan.

"The actual number of those who have had their permits revoked is statistically non-existent," said Coun. Sergio Morales. "We get more response over bonfires than we do over taxes."

Mayor Jeff Lehman noted this was the third time in five years council has dealt with the chimineas.

"It seems to strike a chord with people," he said. "For some it's too much of an intrusion to ban it."

Lehman noted that while Barrie is a city, its residents still have ties to outdoor activities.

Coun. Peter Silveira noted having the fires are a social activity.

"We live in a city. It's about compromise," he said.

Couns. John Brassard and Barry Ward have consistently supported a ban, and they did Monday - while admitting the zero tolerance policy is working.

Ward said a burning ban is inevitable, just like a smoking ban was years ago.

"But I can live with the compromise we have," he said. "It seems to be working, but people don't like to call the fire department for this."

"An urban setting is not the right place for them,"said Brassard, a firefighter by trade.

A city bylaw allows chimineas for property owners or tenants with the owner's consent. It does prohibit their use between midnight and 8 a.m., with a $305 set fine and victims' surcharge for infractions.

Barrie has a zero-tolerance enforcement policy, meaning all such fires are ordered extinguished upon complaint. A second complaint at the same address within 24 hours can result in a fine. A copy of this policy is provided to anyone receiving an outdoor burning permit.

About 3,500 people apply for the permits annually in Barrie.

Lynn has supported a ban in the past, saying fire department resources and people's health are most important. He has cited Environment Canada about the dangers of smoke and gases from burning wood.

Lynn has also cited a University of Washington study, Health Effects of Wood Smoke, that shows smoke wood particles are too small to be filtered by the nose and upper respiratory system - so they can end up in the lungs. Closed doors and windows don't stop these particles from seeping into homes either. Wood smoke also worsens existing conditions, such as asthma and emphysema.

Ainsworth said she doesn't understand that past city councils didn't get this, and that there are other open air fire options - gas, propane - for "the Kumbaya crowd."

Chimineas permits are available online, at barrie.ca, and at Barrie Fire and Emergency Services Headquarters, 155 Dunlop St. W. Permits fees are increasing to $22 from $10 on May 1.

bob.bruton@sunmedia.ca

source
http://www.thebarrieexaminer.com/2015/0 ... rking-well
• The Surgeon General has determined that there is no safe level of exposure to ambient smoke!

• If you smell even a subtle odor of smoke, you are being exposed to poisonous and carcinogenic chemical compounds!

• Even a brief exposure to smoke raises blood pressure, (no matter what your state of health) and can cause blood clotting, stroke, or heart attack in vulnerable people. Even children experience elevated blood pressure when exposed to smoke!

• Since smoke drastically weakens the lungs' immune system, avoiding smoke is one of the best ways to prevent colds, flu, bronchitis, or risk of an even more serious respiratory illness, such as pneumonia or tuberculosis! Does your child have the flu? Chances are they have been exposed to ambient smoke!
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Location: USA


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