COPD linked to wood smoke

Research studies on wood smoke and other air pollution.

COPD linked to wood smoke

Postby Wilberforce » Mon Apr 08, 2013 7:20 pm

Associations of Ambient Air Pollution with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Hospitalization and Mortality
Wen Qi Gan et al
http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/abs/10.1 ... 211-2004OC
Abstract

Rationale: Ambient air pollution has been suggested as a risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, there is a lack of longitudinal studies to support this assertion.

Objectives: To investigate the associations of long-term exposure to elevated traffic-related air pollution and woodsmoke pollution with the risk of COPD hospitalization and mortality.

Methods: This population-based cohort study included a 5-year exposure period and a 4-year follow-up period. All residents aged 45–85 years who resided in Metropolitan Vancouver, Canada, during the exposure period and did not have known COPD at baseline were included in this study (n = 467,994). Residential exposures to traffic-related air pollutants (black carbon, particulate matter <2.5 µm in aerodynamic diameter, nitrogen dioxide, and nitric oxide) and woodsmoke were estimated using land-use regression models and integrating changes in residences during the exposure period. COPD hospitalizations and deaths during the follow-up period were identified from provincial hospitalization and death registration databases.

Measurements and Main Results: An interquartile range elevation in black carbon concentrations (0.97 × 10-5/m, equivalent to 0.78 µg/m3 elemental carbon) was associated with a 6% (95% confidence interval, 2–10%) increase in COPD hospitalizations and a 7% (0–13%) increase in COPD mortality after adjustment for covariates. Exposure to higher levels of woodsmoke pollution (tertile 3 vs. tertile 1) was associated with a 15% (2–29%) increase in COPD hospitalizations. There were positive exposure–response trends for these observed associations.

Conclusions: Ambient air pollution, including traffic-related fine particulate pollution and woodsmoke pollution, is associated with an increased risk of COPD.
• The Surgeon General has determined that there is no safe level of exposure to ambient smoke!

• If you smell even a subtle odor of smoke, you are being exposed to poisonous and carcinogenic chemical compounds!

• Even a brief exposure to smoke raises blood pressure, (no matter what your state of health) and can cause blood clotting, stroke, or heart attack in vulnerable people. Even children experience elevated blood pressure when exposed to smoke!

• Since smoke drastically weakens the lungs' immune system, avoiding smoke is one of the best ways to prevent colds, flu, bronchitis, or risk of an even more serious respiratory illness, such as pneumonia or tuberculosis! Does your child have the flu? Chances are they have been exposed to ambient smoke!
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