Childhood exposure to smoke effect of clogged arteries

Research studies on wood smoke and other air pollution.

Childhood exposure to smoke effect of clogged arteries

Postby Wilberforce » Tue Mar 24, 2015 10:25 am

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Exposure to Parental Smoking in Childhood is Associated with Increased Risk of Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaque
in Adulthood: The Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study
West, et al
http://circ.ahajournals.org/content/ear ... 5.abstract
Abstract

Background—The association between passive smoking exposure in childhood and adverse cardiovascular health in adulthood is not well understood. Using a 26-year follow-up study, we examined if childhood exposure to passive smoking was associated with carotid atherosclerotic plaque in young adults.

Methods and Results—Participants were from the Cardiovascular Risk in Young Finns Study (N=2,448). Information on childhood exposure to parental smoking was collected in 1980 and 1983. Carotid ultrasound data was collected in adulthood in 2001 or 2007. Childhood serum cotinine levels from 1980 were measured from frozen samples in 2014 (N=1,578). The proportion of children with non-detectable cotinine levels was highest among households where neither parent smoked (84%), decreased in households where one parent smoked (62%), and was lowest among households where both parents smoked (43%). Irrespective of adjustment for potential confounding and mediating variables, the relative risk (RR) of developing carotid plaque in adulthood increased among those where one or both parents smoked (RR=1.7, 95%CI=1.0-2.8, P=0.04). Although children whose parents exercised good "smoking hygiene" (smoking parents whose children had non-detectable cotinine levels) had increased risk of carotid plaque compared with non-smoking parents (RR=1.6, 95%CI=0.6-4.0, P=0.34), children of smoking parents with poor smoking hygiene (smoking parents whose children had detectable serum cotinine levels) had substantially increased risk of plaque as adults (RR=4.0, 95%CI=1.7-9.8, P=0.002).

Conclusions—Children of parents that smoke have increased risk of developing carotid atherosclerotic plaque in adulthood. However, parents who exercise good smoking hygiene can lessen their child's risk of developing plaque.
• The Surgeon General has determined that there is no safe level of exposure to ambient smoke!

• If you smell even a subtle odor of smoke, you are being exposed to poisonous and carcinogenic chemical compounds!

• Even a brief exposure to smoke raises blood pressure, (no matter what your state of health) and can cause blood clotting, stroke, or heart attack in vulnerable people. Even children experience elevated blood pressure when exposed to smoke!

• Since smoke drastically weakens the lungs' immune system, avoiding smoke is one of the best ways to prevent colds, flu, bronchitis, or risk of an even more serious respiratory illness, such as pneumonia or tuberculosis! Does your child have the flu? Chances are they have been exposed to ambient smoke!
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Re: Childhood exposure to smoke effect of clogged arteries

Postby Wilberforce » Sun Jan 17, 2016 7:08 am

Childhood Environmental Tobacco Smoke Exposure: A Smoking Gun for Atherosclerosis in Adulthood
http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content ... 31/14/1231

http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/reprint/131/14/1231

In the 1960s, the US Surgeon General and American Heart Association issued reports warning of the dangers of smoking on fatal coronary artery disease.1–3 Since those early publications, 32 US Surgeon General reports and thousands of studies have been released exposing the harmful effects of cigarette smoking on cardiovascular health.4,5 Yet, more than a half a century later, the toxic legacy continues to unravel. Cigarette smoking is now well established as a causal risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Pooled data from almost 1 million people reveals that the risk of ischemic heart disease for current smokers is 2.6 times (95% confidence interval [CI], 2.4–2.7) higher for men and 3.0 times (95% CI, 2.8–3.2) higher for women compared with nonsmokers.6 Secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure has emerged as a significant risk factor for CVD among nonsmokers, demonstrating a dose-dependent relationship with higher risk of CVD among those with higher SHS exposure.7–9 In epidemiological studies, the risk of coronary heart disease among SHS-exposed nonsmoking adults is 1.25 times (95% CI, 1.17–1.32) higher than unexposed adults.
• The Surgeon General has determined that there is no safe level of exposure to ambient smoke!

• If you smell even a subtle odor of smoke, you are being exposed to poisonous and carcinogenic chemical compounds!

• Even a brief exposure to smoke raises blood pressure, (no matter what your state of health) and can cause blood clotting, stroke, or heart attack in vulnerable people. Even children experience elevated blood pressure when exposed to smoke!

• Since smoke drastically weakens the lungs' immune system, avoiding smoke is one of the best ways to prevent colds, flu, bronchitis, or risk of an even more serious respiratory illness, such as pneumonia or tuberculosis! Does your child have the flu? Chances are they have been exposed to ambient smoke!
User avatar
Wilberforce
 
Posts: 6093
Joined: Wed Jul 25, 2007 11:36 pm
Location: USA


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