"Take Back the Air", Minneapolis, MN

Be a part of the solution to air pollution.

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"Take Back the Air", Minneapolis, MN

Postby pm2.5mary » Tue Oct 31, 2006 7:24 pm

"Take Back the Air" http://takebacktheair.com is a new grassroots organization in Minneapolis, MN, dedicated to spreading the word about the Top 3 Neighborhood Air Pollutants:
1. Woodsmoke
2. Scented Laundry Products, which are on the US Dept. of Health's "Top 10 Killer Household Chemicals" list.
3. Lawn Chemicals
"Particulate pollution is the most important contaminant in our air. ...we know that when particle levels go up, people die. " (Joel Schwartz, Ph.D., Harvard School of Public Health, E Magazine, Sept./Oct. 2002)
Find more at http://burningissues.org
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Minneapolis, MN: Star Tribune Jan.12, 2007

Postby pm2.5mary » Fri Jan 12, 2007 6:46 pm

StarTribune.com
FIX011307

Last update: January 12, 2007 – 7:18 PM
Fixit: Where there's smoke, there may be laws

By Karen Youso, Star Tribune
Q Are there laws that regulate smoke from fireplaces or stoves?

A It depends on where you live.

"There could be old laws sitting in the books from the old coal-burning days that deal with smoke," said state energy specialist Phil Smith. Call your city and country for restrictions in your area.

But to the best of his knowledge, Smith said, there is no state law that regulates fireplace and wood-stove emissions.

But it may not stay that way. When there are enough wood-burning devices that air quality degrades, it becomes a health issue and states and cities typically take action. That was the case for many northeastern states, Smith said. Denver and other cities in western states have ordinances regarding smoke emission.

Federal regulations exist for emissions from wood-burning appliances made since 1988. They govern the operation of stove and stove-type inserts for fireplaces. But traditional wood-burning fireplaces and outdoor devices, such as fire pits, have been exempt.

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, wood-burning stoves and fireplaces can emit large quantities of air pollutants. Wood smoke contains hundreds of chemical compounds, including nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, organic gases, and particulate matter. Besides the visual impact of wood smoke, many of these compounds can cause serious health problems, especially for children, pregnant women and people with respiratory ailments. Several of these pollutants have demonstrated cancer-causing properties similar to cigarette smoke.

Send your questions to Fixit in care of the Star Tribune, 425 Portland Av. S., Minneapolis, MN 55488, or call 612-673-9033, or e-mail fixit@startribune.com. Past colum ns are available at www.startribune.com/fixit. Sorry, Fixit cannot supply individual replies.

©2007 Star Tribune. All rights reserved.
"Particulate pollution is the most important contaminant in our air. ...we know that when particle levels go up, people die. " (Joel Schwartz, Ph.D., Harvard School of Public Health, E Magazine, Sept./Oct. 2002)
Find more at http://burningissues.org
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